Halloween Safety Month

Posted by CooperVision on Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Halloween is almost here, which means that scary costumes and candy are on the minds of many people. While all of this is a lot of fun, be sure to be safe especially with regards to your eyes. Here are some tips to help keep your eyes safe during Halloween:

Always Get Your Contact Lenses From An Eye Doctor

Decorative contact lenses may be tempting to don with a costume for Halloween, but remember to book an appointment with an eye doctor for any contact lenses. Since contact lenses are medical devices regulated by the Food & Drug Administration, obtaining contact lenses from a costume shop, beauty supply chain, or any place other than an eye doctor means that you are putting your eyes at risk for potentially blinding eye infections. Purchase the contact lenses from a licensed eye doctor. This ensures that the contact lenses you use are ordered from a licensed contact lens manufacturer and complies with all FDA regulations.

If blurred vision, redness, discomfort, swelling or discharge occurs, discontinue use of the contact lens immediately and see an eye doctor as soon as possible, as these may be signs of serious eye issues such as corneal abrasion, conjunctivitis, or corneal ulcer.

Avoid Pointed Objects as Costume Props

Costume props such as swords, spears, knives and wands may help make a Halloween costume more dramatic, but it can also be dangerous for your eyes. Should you get poked in the eye with a costume prop, make sure you see an eye doctor immediately.

Only Use FDA Approved Makeup Around the Eyes

Some costumes call for makeup around the eyes. Only use makeup that is approved for use around the eyes. Avoid using any makeup in the waterline (inner rim of the eye) and near the tear ducts. When removing makeup around the eyes, use an eye makeup remover instead of water and soap in order to avoid eye irritation. If the eye is red or irritated for a prolonged period of time, make sure to see an eye doctor.

Have a very safe and happy Halloween!

Eye Safety At Home

Posted by CooperVision on Tuesday, September 18, 2012

September is Home Eye Safety Awareness Month. Prevent Blindness America has declared this as a month to make people aware of the dangers around the home that can damage the precious gift of sight. According to Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, it only takes a moment to lose your eyesight in an accident at home: “All too often, when we’re working around the house and doing chores that we've done a thousand times before without incident, we forget about the risks we take by not protecting our eyes. But all it takes is one split-second accident that could damage your vision for a lifetime."

90% of eye injuries are preventable by wearing the proper eye protection. The AAO and the American Society of Ocular Trauma (ASOT) recommends that every home have at least one pair of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved eyewear in order to prevent eye injuries around the house. The eyewear should have the "Z-87" logo stamped on the frames and can be found at hardware stores and home building centers.

Protective eyewear should be used for tasks such as using power tools, rotary mowers, line lawn trimmers, or hammering on metal, and when using any chemical. Wearing protective eyewear especially during yard and garden work is critical because 40% of all eye injuries sustained at home happen during these chores. Even if you do wear eye protection during such tasks, make sure to be mindful of passersby such as small children. If they approach you, shut off all power tools.

If you, or a loved one does suffer an eye injury at home, make sure to talk to an eye doctor immediately.

Home And Sports Eye Safety Month

Posted by CooperVision on Monday, September 10, 2012

September is Home and Sports Eye Safety Month. According to Prevent Blindness America, there are thousands of eye injuries a year related to sports and hazards around the house. Here are some tips that you can use to help prevent eye injuries:

Wear eye protection

Did you know that almost 90% of eye injuries can be prevented by wearing eye protection? Protecting eyes during sports and risky household chores can help prevent blindness and permanent eye damage.

Some sports are riskier than others. Click here for a list of sports that you may need to wear protective eyewear.

Also make sure to wear protective eyewear when performing risky household tasks such as:

  • Clipping hedges
  • Mowing the lawn
  • Cooking food that can cause oil to splatter
  • Opening champagne bottles
  • Drilling or hammering
  • Cleaning with hazardous chemicals

Use protective shields while cooking

Read labels of chemical cleaning products before using them.

Inspect the lawn or area where you will perform yard work for potential flying debris.

Cushion sharp edges on furniture if you have children or elderly individuals in the house

Check to ensure that spray nozzles are pointing away from you

Use tools that are in good condition

If you think you have an eye injury, make sure to contact an eye doctor immediately.

Cosmetic Precautions for Contact Lens Wearers

Posted by CooperVision on Thursday, January 26, 2012

Mixing contact lenses and cosmetics can be a messy situation.  Here are some tips from the American Optometric Association (AOA) that will help you keep your eyes safe while using cosmetics and contact lenses.

  • Put on soft contact lenses before applying makeup.
  • Put on rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses after makeup is applied.
  • Avoid lash-extending mascara, which has fibers that can irritate the eyes, and waterproof mascara, which cannot be easily removed with water and may stain soft contact lenses.
  • Do not use hand creams.
  •  Remove contact lenses before removing makeup.
  • Choose an oil-free moisturizer or lotions before applying contacts.  They can leave film on your lenses.
  • Use hairspray before putting on your contacts. If you use hairspray while you are wearing your contacts, close your eyes during spraying and for a few seconds afterwards.
  • Blink your eyes frequently while under a hair drier or blower to keep your eyes from getting too dry.
  • Keep false eyelash cement, nail polish and remover, perfume and cologne away from the lenses. They can damage the plastic.
  • Choose water-based, hypo-allergenic liquid foundations. Cream makeup may leave a film on your lenses.¹

 ¹http://www.aoa.org/x5236.xml

The importance or winter eye protection

Posted by CooperVision on Tuesday, January 17, 2012

It is extremely important to be sure that eyes are protected in the winter months, especially if you are a contact lens wearer. Many outdoor activities should be accompanied by eye protection; from debris, and from the sun.  Activities in the snow such as skiing, snowboarding and sledding should be accompanied by goggles that also have UVA and UVB protection.  “On a sunny winter day, snow can reflect 80% of all UV rays.”¹  Light reflecting from the snow can damage eyes; even if the sun may not seem as strong as the summer.   It is also extremely important to protect children’s eyes; this may decrease chances of certain eye diseases later in life.  

Be sure to remind your patients about the importance of eye protection in the colder months.  For more some information on how CooperVision’s contact lenses can improve your overall sports performance please click here.

¹http://www.chla.org/site/c.ipINKTOAJsG/b.6063229/k.AD84/Winter_Sports_Eye_Safety__Eye_Health_Tips__The_Vision_Center.htm

Eye Safety Reminder

Posted by Harvard Sylvan, OD on Tuesday, October 26, 2010

As Halloween is approaching and cosmetic (vanity) contact lenses are often in high demand, it is important to remember that a contact lens is a medical device and requires a prescription. Even though you may consider contacts an accessory or part of your costume, you should not disregard the fact that the health of your eyes may be at risk. Any contact lens that is not FDA approved may not be safe for use. In addition, it is imperative to understand and comply with the proper disinfection routine, the correct insertion and removal technique and the recommended wearing schedule.  Not following proper care and handling guidelines can potentially lead to serious, sight-threatening eye infections.  Another important fact to remember is to not share contact lenses with anyone else.  Occasionally you will see fashion or costume contact lenses advertised online or on TV.  Be cautious of any contact lenses advertised from a non-trusted source. 

The potential dangers and risks of non-prescription contact lenses far outweigh any fashion benefit. Remember – to ensure the safest wearing experience, contacts require a prescription from a licensed eye care professional as well as the necessary wearing instructions and follow up care. Always consult an eye doctor before considering any type of contact lenses.

To find an eye doctor near you, please click here. Have a safe and happy Halloween!

About On Eye

On Eye is the contact lens blog from CooperVision. On this site, you will find insights about fitting, technology, and the business of contact lenses. The On Eye blog is designed to meet the needs of both Eye Care Practitioners and consumers. ECP and medical professional-specific portions of the blog will be password protected in order to protect and reserve the privacy of the profession. To read more about our terms of use, please see the Legal tab.

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