Free Multifocal Webinar - Keeping Up with the Multifocal Market

Posted by CooperVision on Wednesday, September 21, 2011
Did you miss last week's free multifocal webinar on ODWire.org? Jason Miller, OD, MBA, FAAO led a one hour discussion on the clinical and practice management aspects of fitting progressive lenses, with an interactive Question & Answer session immediately following. Log In or Register to access the entire recorded webinar.

Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

CooperVision Course at Optometry's Meeting Addresses Needs of ODs Fitting Multifocal Contacts

Posted by CooperVision on Friday, September 2, 2011
To celebrate the launch of Biofinity Multifocal, the latest addition to the Biofinity family of contact lenses, we hosted two live multifocal fitting workshops at this year's Optometry's Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. AOA News recently published an article detailing the workshops, including audience member feedback. Read an excerpt here:

As many Optometry’s Meeting® attendees discovered, seeing really is believing when it comes to fitting multifocal contact lenses. A CooperVision-sponsored course in the Discovery Theater this June in Salt Lake City demonstrated that fitting multifocal lenses is not difficult. Mark Andre, Don Siegel, O.D., and Harvard Sylvan, O.D., presented “Seeing is Believing: A Live Multifocal Workshop,” which included the fitting of presbyopic patients with little or no previous multifocal experience.

“I have to admit that although I have been in practice for many years I still have reservations about fitting patients with soft multifocal contacts,” said Joe Martin, O.D., a course attendee. “It just seems to take too much time and the visual outcomes are often disappointing. So the live fitting of patients in the Discovery Theater drew my interest as the description indicated that the session would demonstrate that fitting multifocals is not time consuming or complicated.”

Nazanin Galehdari, O.D., a local practitioner from Salt Lake City, performed the refractions and eye health evaluations on the patients who were fit at these sessions. Biofinity Multifocals were not fit on any of these patients prior to being fit in the Discovery Theater. The first patient was a 46-year-old woman who was a -3.75 myope with a +1.50 add and was wearing a competitor’s soft multifocal contact lens. The second patient was a 58-year-old woman who was a +1.00 hyperope with a +2.25 add and was wearing monovision-configured contact lenses.

“The responses from the patients were unsolicited, and yet each one enthusiastically stated that the comfort and vision were excellent,” said Dr. Martin. “They both left very satisfied with the lenses and had appointments made with Dr. Galehdari for their follow-up care. Both patients were fit in almost the same timeframe as a sphere patient.”

Read the full article here. For more information on Biofinity Multifocal, please click here. Do you have a Biofinity Multifocal success story you want to share? We want to hear it! Email us at blogadmin@coopervision.com and we may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

Multifocal Tips from the Trenches

Posted by Mile Brujic, OD on Thursday, August 25, 2011

Today I want to touch on 5 key barriers that may limit successful multifocal contact lens fitting and how to overcome them.

1) Get Passionate about Multifocal Lenses – Demographic information tells us that presbyopes make up one of the largest segments of our practice. If you're not on board now with multifocal lenses you should be.

I've found that, by and large, those practices that have success with multifocal lenses are those practices that have experience fitting the lenses. Those that are successful fitting them will speak very differently about multifocal lenses with their patients because of the successes that they have had fitting previous patients. The catch 22 is that often times without those successes, it is difficult to communicate this technology with passion and with a high level of confidence to patients. My recommendation would be to mention multifocal lenses to everyone who is a candidate. This will get you more comfortable discussing multifocal contact lenses with your patients.

Here is an example of an effective yet easily delivered question that will usually peak a patients interest: “Did you know that there are contact lenses that will allow you to see things up close without the use of glasses? If you are interested, I think that you would be an excellent candidate.” From this simple question and statement, you will be able to gauge your patient's interest. For those that were unaware of the technology, you have now made them aware. For those that are interested, this will likely lead to further questions about these contact lenses. Be certain to discuss multifocal contact lenses with every candidate.

2) Setting Proper Expectations for Your Patients – Further questions from your patients regarding multifocal contact lenses will give you the chance to then describe the way they work in greater detail. Expectations are important because if set incorrectly, it has the chance of potentially leading to a fitting failure.

In discussing the technology with patients, I will always describe multifocal contact lenses as “increasing functional vision and minimizing the use of reading glasses.” This sets the goals very clearly from the start. It is positive in that you are letting the patient know what the contacts will do but yet realistic in its approach. In this way patients will think of the additional tasks that they will be able to perform with their contact lenses without the need for reading glasses including things like viewing a cell phone, computer, reading menus, seeing maps and reading the newspaper, just to name a few.

3) Follow the Fitting Guides – Industry places a significant amount of resources into determining the most successful strategies for selecting the initial diagnostic lenses and then trouble shooting any problems that may arise. There may be the temptation to veer from the guides, but this will often lead a practitioner and patient off of the path of fitting success. Many manufacturers include fitting guides in product literature and/or post them online.

4) Demonstrate Success Immediately – I will initially let the contact lenses settle anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes and then demonstrate success. The way I do this is, before I measure visual acuity, I will have the patient view their cell phone and ask them if they can see it. Before the appointment they likely could not see their cell phone without their reading glasses and now they can. Another task that I have these patients do is look at a computer screen in the exam room that is about 16 to 20 inches away from them. The immediate success that patients will have creates a positive experience with the lenses. I will then measure visual acuities and over-refract using trial lenses.

5) Follow up questions – When patients come in for their follow up visits after 1 to 2 weeks, make sure to ask them what they are satisfied with and what they wish they could improve about their vision. This is an opportunity for the practitioner to re-educate the patient on the benefits and limitations of multifocals. Additionally, this will allow the practitioner and patient to work together to determine whether the powers in the contact lenses could be modified to better meet their needs.

By following these 5 steps you are certain to improve your multifocal fitting success.

Dr. Brujic graduated from the New England College of Optometry. He is currently a partner of a successful four location optometric practice in Northwest Ohio. He practices full scope optometry with special interest in contact lenses and ocular disease management of the anterior segment and glaucoma. He publishes a monthly column in Review of Cornea and Contact Lens and has written in numerous other optometric publications. He is active at all levels of organized optometry.

 For more information on fitting multifocal contacts, please click here.

Strategies to Improve Your Multifocal Success

Posted by CooperVision on Monday, June 13, 2011
Did you miss last week's free multifocal webinar, hosted by Mark Andre, FAAO in conjunction with ODWire.org? Log in or register to access the recorded version, including a sneak peak of Biofinity Multifocal, CooperVision's premium silicone hydrogel multifocal lens, launching in June!

Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Free Multifocal Webinar

Posted by CooperVision on Friday, June 3, 2011
Join us on Wednesday, June 8th at 9:00 PM EST for a free webinar in partnership with ODWire.org. Hosted by Mark Andre, FAAO, Change Your View of Multifocal Lenses: Strategies to Improve Your Multifocal Success and Profitability is an informative look at multifocals and will cover topics like successful recruitment and management of presbyopic patients. Plus, the webinar will offer an early look at Biofinity Multifocal, which will be available later this month. Log In or Register to view the rest of this post.

Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Change Your View of Multifocals

Posted by Doug Brayer on Wednesday, June 1, 2011
With the launch of Biofinity Multifocal, the newest addition to the Biofinity family of lenses, right around the corner, we're pleased to announce the following events:

Log In or Register to view the upcoming events. We hope you can attend!

Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

What is Presbyopia?

Posted by CooperVision on Thursday, March 31, 2011
In honor of Presybopia Awareness month, which starts tomorrow, we'd like to test your knowledge!  Watch along as Mark Malkoff heads to New York City's Grand Central Station to find out how many people can define presbyopia - how did you do? 

What is Presbyopia?

Presbyopia is a condition that affects those patients over the age of 40 – it’s a natural process that makes it difficult to read small print. The good news is it’s correctable. Be sure to talk to your eye care provider about CooperVision multifocal contact lens options.

Gear Up for Hunting and Shooting Season with Multifocal Contacts

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Aside from working in the ophthalmic industry for the past 30 years, I’ve also spent the past 30 years being active in competitive handgun and rifle shooting. Based on my experience in both fields, I’d like to discuss the effects of vision correction and aging on the sport of hunting and shooting.

Whether you’re a competitive target shooter, experienced hunter, or new to either sport, you need the right gear to be successful. You spend time, energy, and money prepping for the season and purchasing new equipment. Why not spend some time reviewing one of your most important pieces of equipment – your eyes. You may be surprised, but a review of your vision may help improve your performance.
 
Optics and Sight:
A younger shooter (under the age of 40) has native vision capabilities, meaning he or she is able to take full advantage of the optics on their firearms. As a shooter gets closer to 40 (the average age for the onset of presbyopia, a natural vision condition in which the eye starts to lose clarity for near images), he or she begins to lose the ability to use the sights or optics of their firearms, due to near vision loss, usually causing a decrease in performance level.

In these sports, simultaneous vision is key. Avid hunters and shooters purchase expensive equipment to ensure they can see the sights and target clearly. If you’re nearing 40 (or older), and facing the issue of losing near vision, one of the simplest ways to improve your game is to consider multifocal contact lenses.

How to Improve Your Performance: Multifocal Contact Lenses
If you want to fully maximize your capabilities for simultaneous vision, I highly encourage you to talk to your doctor about multifocal contact lenses. Multifocal contact lenses are the contact lens alternative to bifocal glasses. Bifocal glasses provide distance vision on the top level and near vision on the bottom level. With bifocal glasses, you have to adjust your line of sight to either the distance target or the near target. Multifocal contact lenses use optics specifically designed to produce both distance and near clarity at the same time, eliminating the need to force your eyes into different viewing levels.

Besides providing more natural vision, other benefits to wearing contact lenses while hunting or shooting include the elimination of foggy glasses, misplaced glasses, and not having to deal with rain on your lenses or the hassle of taking your glasses on and off. No matter what your vision correction need is, contact lenses are a great option for full time or occasional wear for sports.

*While you may choose to wear contact lenses for your personal vision needs, it is always recommended that you wear some form of eye protection when participating in shooting and hunting sports.

Whether you are an early presbyope (just discovering the need for reading glasses) or a presbyope with astigmatism, we have contact lenses for most every vision need. For more information about multifocal contact lenses, please visit our website.

To find the doctor nearest you, use our Practitioner Locator and ask about the Proclear line of contacts. Gear up for your best hunting and/or shooting season yet!

Gear Up for Hunting and Shooting Season with Multifocal Contacts

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Thursday, July 22, 2010

Aside from working in the ophthalmic industry for the past 30 years, I’ve also spent the past 30 years being active in competitive handgun and rifle shooting. Based on my experience in both fields, I’d like to discuss the effects of vision correction and aging on the sport of hunting and shooting.

Whether you’re a competitive target shooter, experienced hunter, or new to either sport, you need the right gear to be successful. You spend time, energy, and money prepping for the season and purchasing new equipment. Why not spend some time reviewing one of your most important pieces of equipment – your eyes. You may be surprised, but a review of your vision may help improve your performance.
 
Optics and Sight:
A younger shooter (under the age of 40) has native vision capabilities, meaning he or she is able to take full advantage of the optics on their firearms. As a shooter gets closer to 40 (the average age for the onset of presbyopia, a natural vision condition in which the eye starts to lose clarity for near images), he or she begins to lose the ability to use the sights or optics of their firearms, due to near vision loss, usually causing a decrease in performance level.

In these sports, simultaneous vision is key. Avid hunters and shooters purchase expensive equipment to ensure they can see the sights and target clearly. If you’re nearing 40 (or older), and facing the issue of losing near vision, one of the simplest ways to improve your game is to consider multifocal contact lenses.

How to Improve Your Performance: Multifocal Contact Lenses
If you want to fully maximize your capabilities for simultaneous vision, I highly encourage you to talk to your doctor about multifocal contact lenses. Multifocal contact lenses are the contact lens alternative to bifocal glasses. Bifocal glasses provide distance vision on the top level and near vision on the bottom level. With bifocal glasses, you have to adjust your line of sight to either the distance target or the near target. Multifocal contact lenses use optics specifically designed to produce both distance and near clarity at the same time, eliminating the need to force your eyes into different viewing levels.

Besides providing more natural vision, other benefits to wearing contact lenses while hunting or shooting include the elimination of foggy glasses, misplaced glasses, and not having to deal with rain on your lenses or the hassle of taking your glasses on and off. No matter what your vision correction need is, contact lenses are a great option for full time or occasional wear for sports.

*While you may choose to wear contact lenses for your personal vision needs, it is always recommended that you wear some form of eye protection when participating in shooting and hunting sports.

Whether you are an early presbyope (just discovering the need for reading glasses) or a presbyope with astigmatism, we have contact lenses for most every vision need. For more information about multifocal contact lenses, please visit our website

To find the doctor nearest you, use our Practitioner Locator and ask about the Proclear line of contacts. Gear up for your best hunting and/or shooting season yet!

About On Eye

On Eye is the contact lens blog from CooperVision. On this site, you will find insights about fitting, technology, and the business of contact lenses. The On Eye blog is designed to meet the needs of both Eye Care Practitioners and consumers. ECP and medical professional-specific portions of the blog will be password protected in order to protect and reserve the privacy of the profession. To read more about our terms of use, please see the Legal tab.

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