What is Presbyopia?

Posted by CooperVision on Thursday, March 31, 2011
In honor of Presybopia Awareness month, which starts tomorrow, we'd like to test your knowledge!  Watch along as Mark Malkoff heads to New York City's Grand Central Station to find out how many people can define presbyopia - how did you do? 

What is Presbyopia?

Presbyopia is a condition that affects those patients over the age of 40 – it’s a natural process that makes it difficult to read small print. The good news is it’s correctable. Be sure to talk to your eye care provider about CooperVision multifocal contact lens options.

Building Your Practice with Digital iHealth and Multifocals - Part 1

Posted by Mile Brujic, OD on Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Dr. Jason Miller and Dr. Mile Brujic recently co-presented a CooperVision sponsored webinar on ODWire.org titled Building Your Practice with Digital iHealth and Multifocals. Below is a summary of the business of multifocals portion of the presentation, written by Dr. Mile Brujic. Log In or Register to read more!


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Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #8

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, March 2, 2010

MYTH #8: Patients with ADD at +2.00 and +2.50 do not get adequate near vision with multifocal contact lenses.

FACT:  Log In or Register to find out how the final myth in our Multifocal Mythbusters Series is debunked!


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Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #7

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, February 16, 2010

MYTH #7: Emetropes do not do well with multifocals.

FACT: Log In or Register to debunk this myth!

 

 

 


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Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #6

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, February 2, 2010

The Multifocal Mythbuster List continues… Log In or Register to read Myth #6.


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What the Experts are Saying about Multifocals

Posted by Doug Brayer on Thursday, January 21, 2010

Last year, CooperVision launched Focus on Presbyopia, an electronic newsletter dedicated to optimizing opportunities with multifocal contact lenses in your practice. Over the course of this past year, I had the pleasure to work closely with many talented multifocal experts who contributed to this newsletter.  Log In or Register to read my top 10 multifocal tips from past issues of Focus on Presbyopia.


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Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myths #1-4

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Thursday, January 14, 2010

Over the course of the past six years, I have dedicated most of my time to promoting the use and fitting of multifocal contact lenses. A number of misperceptions continue to arise. There are 8 in particular that I’d like to address. Log In or Register to read the first four.


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Leveraging Multifocals to Build Your Practice

Posted by Leslie Donahue on Thursday, January 7, 2010

In the past year, many practices have experienced a decrease in office traffic and revenue due to the recession. Which begs the question: what can we do in 2010 to bounce back? The answer is actually quite simple – PROMOTE MULTIFOCALS! Log In or Register to view tips on how to promote multifocals and to see why it’s in your best interest.


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The State of the Contact Lens Industry

Posted by Dennis Murphy on Tuesday, December 15, 2009

At this time last year the economy was in crisis. Industries across the board, including the contact lens industry, were braced for a year of financial hardship. While many industries had significantly down years in 2009, the contact lens market grew by 2% to 4%, depending on which metric one chooses.

          The fact that growth could take place under very difficult economic circumstances demonstrates that the contact lens market, while certainly not recession-proof, is, to an extent, recession-resistant. We attribute this to the important role contact lenses play in people’s lives—a role people are not willing to give up, even when money is tight.

          Now, as we move into 2010, we expect to see more rapid growth, driven by daily disposable lenses, multifocal lenses, and newer materials. Log In or Register to continue reading the State of the Contact Lens Industry post.


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Just Because You Need Bifocals Doesn't Mean You Have to Wear Them!

Posted by Doug Brayer on Thursday, December 10, 2009

If you’re in your 40’s (or even approaching 40) you may have noticed reading and seeing objects up close isn’t quite as easy as it used to be.  Not to worry – you’ve got a very common vision condition called presbyopia.  In fact, presbyopia is so common that is affects virtually everybody, usually starting around the age of 40.

 

Most people think of presbyopia when they hear the word “bifocals” or “reading glasses”.  I think most of us can relate to either our parents or grandparents reaching for their bifocals or reading glasses.  The good news today is that needing bifocals doesn’t have to mean wearing bifocals.  Advances in contact lens designs now make multifocal contact lenses a great option for addressing presbyopia.  In fact, with patient visits up 75% in the multifocal category since 2002, multifocals are the fastest growing segment in the contact lens industry.

 

Nearly 90 million Americans – or roughly one in three – have presbyopia, yet awareness of this condition is very low.  A study sponsored by CooperVision that was conducted by Harris Interactive found that 83% of US adults aged 18+ are not aware of the vision condition. So how do you know if you have it? If you are experiencing any of the common symptoms of presbyopia – such as a noticeable change in near vision, eyestrain, or headaches, you should see an eye care specialist to discuss your options.

 

The contact lens options for this growing segment of the population provide a convenient, comfortable and healthy alternative to bifocals or reading glasses.  CooperVision offers the most comprehensive multifocal contact lens portfolio in the industry.  Multifocal contact lenses from CooperVision contain multiple zones of vision correction by providing the wearer with simultaneous distance, intermediate and near vision.  The word simultaneous is key because most people think of these lenses much like bifocals where you have to look at a certain zone to see clearly at near.  This is not the case with multifocal contacts.  Multifocal contacts allow you to naturally see clearly up close, at middle distances (like using a computer) and far away without having to focus your eyes in a certain zone of the lens.

 

If you’re one of the millions of long time contact lenses wearers entering your 40’s, you can continue to enjoy the comfort and convenience of contact lenses.  Even if you’ve never worn contacts before, or if you dropped out of contacts in the past, the onset of presbyopia is a great time to try contacts for the first time.

 

Presbyopia is the normal worsening of vision with age – especially near vision.  The condition is a natural part of aging that eventually affects everyone.  As we grow older, the lenses in our eyes thicken and lose their elasticity, and the muscles surrounding the lens weaken.  Both these changes decrease our ability to focus, especially on near objects.  Besides, blurred near vision, the signs of presbyopia include eye strain and the tendency to hold reading materials further away.

About On Eye

On Eye is the contact lens blog from CooperVision. On this site, you will find insights about fitting, technology, and the business of contact lenses. The On Eye blog is designed to meet the needs of both Eye Care Practitioners and consumers. ECP and medical professional-specific portions of the blog will be password protected in order to protect and reserve the privacy of the profession. To read more about our terms of use, please see the Legal tab.

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