All posts by Jeff Machemer

Gear Up for Hunting and Shooting Season with Multifocal Contacts

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Aside from working in the ophthalmic industry for the past 30 years, I’ve also spent the past 30 years being active in competitive handgun and rifle shooting. Based on my experience in both fields, I’d like to discuss the effects of vision correction and aging on the sport of hunting and shooting.

Whether you’re a competitive target shooter, experienced hunter, or new to either sport, you need the right gear to be successful. You spend time, energy, and money prepping for the season and purchasing new equipment. Why not spend some time reviewing one of your most important pieces of equipment – your eyes. You may be surprised, but a review of your vision may help improve your performance.
 
Optics and Sight:
A younger shooter (under the age of 40) has native vision capabilities, meaning he or she is able to take full advantage of the optics on their firearms. As a shooter gets closer to 40 (the average age for the onset of presbyopia, a natural vision condition in which the eye starts to lose clarity for near images), he or she begins to lose the ability to use the sights or optics of their firearms, due to near vision loss, usually causing a decrease in performance level.

In these sports, simultaneous vision is key. Avid hunters and shooters purchase expensive equipment to ensure they can see the sights and target clearly. If you’re nearing 40 (or older), and facing the issue of losing near vision, one of the simplest ways to improve your game is to consider multifocal contact lenses.

How to Improve Your Performance: Multifocal Contact Lenses
If you want to fully maximize your capabilities for simultaneous vision, I highly encourage you to talk to your doctor about multifocal contact lenses. Multifocal contact lenses are the contact lens alternative to bifocal glasses. Bifocal glasses provide distance vision on the top level and near vision on the bottom level. With bifocal glasses, you have to adjust your line of sight to either the distance target or the near target. Multifocal contact lenses use optics specifically designed to produce both distance and near clarity at the same time, eliminating the need to force your eyes into different viewing levels.

Besides providing more natural vision, other benefits to wearing contact lenses while hunting or shooting include the elimination of foggy glasses, misplaced glasses, and not having to deal with rain on your lenses or the hassle of taking your glasses on and off. No matter what your vision correction need is, contact lenses are a great option for full time or occasional wear for sports.

*While you may choose to wear contact lenses for your personal vision needs, it is always recommended that you wear some form of eye protection when participating in shooting and hunting sports.

Whether you are an early presbyope (just discovering the need for reading glasses) or a presbyope with astigmatism, we have contact lenses for most every vision need. For more information about multifocal contact lenses, please visit our website.

To find the doctor nearest you, use our Practitioner Locator and ask about the Proclear line of contacts. Gear up for your best hunting and/or shooting season yet!

Gear Up for Hunting and Shooting Season with Multifocal Contacts

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Thursday, July 22, 2010

Aside from working in the ophthalmic industry for the past 30 years, I’ve also spent the past 30 years being active in competitive handgun and rifle shooting. Based on my experience in both fields, I’d like to discuss the effects of vision correction and aging on the sport of hunting and shooting.

Whether you’re a competitive target shooter, experienced hunter, or new to either sport, you need the right gear to be successful. You spend time, energy, and money prepping for the season and purchasing new equipment. Why not spend some time reviewing one of your most important pieces of equipment – your eyes. You may be surprised, but a review of your vision may help improve your performance.
 
Optics and Sight:
A younger shooter (under the age of 40) has native vision capabilities, meaning he or she is able to take full advantage of the optics on their firearms. As a shooter gets closer to 40 (the average age for the onset of presbyopia, a natural vision condition in which the eye starts to lose clarity for near images), he or she begins to lose the ability to use the sights or optics of their firearms, due to near vision loss, usually causing a decrease in performance level.

In these sports, simultaneous vision is key. Avid hunters and shooters purchase expensive equipment to ensure they can see the sights and target clearly. If you’re nearing 40 (or older), and facing the issue of losing near vision, one of the simplest ways to improve your game is to consider multifocal contact lenses.

How to Improve Your Performance: Multifocal Contact Lenses
If you want to fully maximize your capabilities for simultaneous vision, I highly encourage you to talk to your doctor about multifocal contact lenses. Multifocal contact lenses are the contact lens alternative to bifocal glasses. Bifocal glasses provide distance vision on the top level and near vision on the bottom level. With bifocal glasses, you have to adjust your line of sight to either the distance target or the near target. Multifocal contact lenses use optics specifically designed to produce both distance and near clarity at the same time, eliminating the need to force your eyes into different viewing levels.

Besides providing more natural vision, other benefits to wearing contact lenses while hunting or shooting include the elimination of foggy glasses, misplaced glasses, and not having to deal with rain on your lenses or the hassle of taking your glasses on and off. No matter what your vision correction need is, contact lenses are a great option for full time or occasional wear for sports.

*While you may choose to wear contact lenses for your personal vision needs, it is always recommended that you wear some form of eye protection when participating in shooting and hunting sports.

Whether you are an early presbyope (just discovering the need for reading glasses) or a presbyope with astigmatism, we have contact lenses for most every vision need. For more information about multifocal contact lenses, please visit our website

To find the doctor nearest you, use our Practitioner Locator and ask about the Proclear line of contacts. Gear up for your best hunting and/or shooting season yet!

Denial and the New Fountain of Youth

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, March 30, 2010

When it comes to aging, most of us would be thrilled to find the fountain of youth. One of the telltale signs of aging is the newfound need for glasses for near vision tasks such as reading. Around the age of 38 to 42, most of us experience some difficulty with small print, fine near vision tasks and late day eye fatigue. The exact age of onset often depends on the extent to which we require our eyes to focus at near and intermediate distance for extended periods of time in our vocation or avocation.

This time period coincides with the transition of young adults moving into the middle age group. It is very common for people in this transitional time of life to deny or delay the need for vision correction in fear of appearing older. So how do you find the fountain of youth when it comes to your eyesight?

First, acceptance of the aging process and the need for some assistance with near vision is not submission or resignation; it’s simply a way to maintain eye comfort, health and performance. We don’t seem to have concern with a knee brace for hiking or an elbow brace for tennis, so why is the correction for the early symptoms of presbyopia such a concern?

Second, explore your options! Did you know there are contact lenses made specifically for those in the early stages of presbyopia? The Proclear line of contact lenses from CooperVision has multiple options for all stages of presbyopia – eliminating the need for reading glasses or bifocals!

We tend to associate bifocals with “old age” or note that someone who pulls out reading glasses looks “distinguished”. Here are two suggestions to help you find that fountain of youth: First, discuss your concerns with your eye care professional. They can test and determine if there is a need. Second, if there is a need, ask about a contact lens product called Proclear EP by CooperVision. It is designed to eliminate the need for reading glasses or bifocal glasses while providing excellent comfort and vision at all ranges.
 
Why should we consider this cure for denial? Simple, it will improve your visual performance and keep you comfortably in the race. Who has to know?
 

Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #8

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, March 2, 2010

MYTH #8: Patients with ADD at +2.00 and +2.50 do not get adequate near vision with multifocal contact lenses.

FACT:  Log In or Register to find out how the final myth in our Multifocal Mythbusters Series is debunked!


Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #7

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, February 16, 2010

MYTH #7: Emetropes do not do well with multifocals.

FACT: Log In or Register to debunk this myth!

 

 

 


Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #6

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, February 2, 2010

The Multifocal Mythbuster List continues… Log In or Register to read Myth #6.


Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myth #5

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Tuesday, January 19, 2010

MYTH #5: After the initial fit, if a patient presents with a distance VA problem, you should always adjust the power of the (D) lens.

FACT: Log In or Register to read how we debunk this myth!

 

 


Practitioners: Log In or Register to view this post.

Multifocal Myths Debunked: Myths #1-4

Posted by Jeff Machemer on Thursday, January 14, 2010

Over the course of the past six years, I have dedicated most of my time to promoting the use and fitting of multifocal contact lenses. A number of misperceptions continue to arise. There are 8 in particular that I’d like to address. Log In or Register to read the first four.


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About The Author

Jeff Machemer

Jeff provides technical, training, and development support for CooperVision in the specialty contact lens segments. He has been involved in the ophthalmic industry for over 30 years and specializes in the education, development, and marketing of specialty contact lens products. He has provided continuing educating internationally and been on the faculty at both Tulane Medical School and Baylor College of Medicine.

About On Eye

On Eye is the contact lens blog from CooperVision. On this site, you will find insights about fitting, technology, and the business of contact lenses. The On Eye blog is designed to meet the needs of both Eye Care Practitioners and consumers. ECP and medical professional-specific portions of the blog will be password protected in order to protect and reserve the privacy of the profession. To read more about our terms of use, please see the Legal tab.

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