InSIGHTs & Trends

The latest innovations in technology, clinical, technical, and R&D.

Astigmatism and Toric Soft Contact Lenses: Now Mainstream?

Posted by CooperVision on Friday, March 8, 2013

By Desmond Fonn

Introduction

Patients with refractive astigmatism who would rather wear contact lenses than spectacles should be fitted with toric soft lenses. This is a sweeping statement as some would argue that for visual reasons spherical rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses will correct astigmatism resulting in visual acuity that would closely match their vision with spectacle lenses.

The argument is flawed if the refractive astigmatism is not all corneal, resulting in residual astigmatism induced by the RGP lens. Plus, there is always approximately 10% residual of the corneal astigmatism with a spherical RGP lens, but it is dependent on the refractive index of the RGP lens material. The range of astigmatism that I am referring to is 0.75 – 3.00D, and if vertexed to the corneal plane might be closer to 2.75D.

The reason for my bold statement is that the current inventory of toric soft contact lens designs would cater for that power range and manufacturing capability is so good that practitioners and patients can be assured of a predictable correction. There is little doubt as well about the vastly superior comfort of soft lenses [1]. In the low astigmatic range, masking of astigmatism with spherical soft lenses does not provide the level of vision of toric soft lenses [2-4], and the visual performance with aspheric lenses is also worse than soft toric lenses. [5]

Prevalence of Astigmatism

In an Australian study of 179 patients in the 1970s, Holden reported that 45% of the prospective contact lens patients exhibited 0.75 D or more of astigmatism and if the astigmatism of 1.00D or greater was corrected, 35% of the patients would require toric lenses but only 25% of the cohort exhibited 1.25 D or more.[6]

Young et al’s paper on the prevalence of astigmatism in relation to soft lens fitting included a summary table of 8 papers and showed that in a large age range, the prevalence ranged from 16 - 45% with astigmatism of 0.75 D or greater. [7] Young et al worked from a database of 11,624 patients (age range 8 to 70 years) and the prevalence of astigmatism of 0.75D group was 24.1% and 1.00 D or greater in both eyes was 15.0%.

The prevalence of astigmatism of 0.75 D or greater in myopes was almost twice that of hyperopes and the prevalence of with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism was higher than against-the-rule (32.9% vs. 29.1%). Their summary showed approximately 33% of potential contact lens wearers require astigmatic correction based on the spectacle prescription from the database.

Cho et al’s paper on spherical and toric daily disposable lenses for low astigmatic corrections included a prevalence of astigmatism summary of 4 papers [9-12]. They wrote 46 to 63% of adults had astigmatism, but the percentage was dependent on the magnitude used as the threshold.

Percentage of the correctable population fitted with toric lenses

Quite appropriately the number and percentage of patients wearing toric lenses has grown quite substantially.

Here are some examples: In 1991, Pearson estimated that only 9% of all soft lens fits in the UK were soft torics [8]. Morgan et al reported that the proportion of toric soft lenses prescribed has grown from approximately 12% to 30% [13,14], and the trends in North America are very similar, perhaps as high as 38% [15,16]. Efron has stated that toric soft lenses now represent over 35% of all soft lenses prescribed, but this survey was restricted to seven countries with the exception of Japan where the percentage there is considerably lower.

Lens designs that stabilize the axis/orientation on the eye

The diameter and posterior surface shape or base curve of toric soft lenses are very similar to spherical lens dimensions, but the thickness profile will be substantially different in order to position the correcting cylinder in the correct meridian and to maintain it in that position. The methods include prism “ballast”, periballast, eccentric lenticulation, back-surface toricity, thin/thick zones, and various combinations of these designs.

Most of the recent design developments have incorporated the latter thickness differential designs, where the top and bottom lids govern the orientation of the lens and therefore the astigmatic correction and they seem to be working very well. In a study recently conducted at the CCLR (data on file), more than 60% of the silicone hydrogel toric lenses dispensed (three currently marketed toric silicone hydrogel lenses) had the same axis as the manifest spectacle correction and the axis of the remainder were within 10 degrees of the spectacle correction.

Reorientation or recovery refers to the toric lens’ ability to speedily relocate to the proper axis after the axis is misaligned, for example when physically misaligning the lens.

A number of terms to have been used to describe the lens recovery performance e.g., “reorientation speed”, or “rotational recovery”, Young et al. used “lens reorientation” to determine whether gravity affects the lens orientation or axis mis-location.

They found that the three prism-ballast design lenses rotated away from their baseline position “significantly more” than the accelerated stabilization lens design [18] and concluded that gravity does affect prism ballasted or peri-ballasted lenses rather than the thin/thick zone lenses when patients adopted a recumbent position. The four lens designs showed similar re-orientation speeds.

Fitting toric lenses

On the basis that inventory toric lenses will be used, the majority of practitioners’ inventory will be less than the 3000 lenses that Young has suggested will be needed for 90% of patients but this method of fitting and prescribing is the best. Even if the exact prescription isn’t within stock, a close approximation will with a high degree of certainty, confirm the lens that is required. The three elements that are necessary to fulfill the correct prescription, assuming that the lens fits symmetrically and centrally over the cornea without excessive movement, are:

  • 1. The refractive correction at the corneal plane
  • 2. The degree of rotation (if any) of the lens
  • 3. The rotational stability of the lens

If the refractive correction is known, the only function of the trial lens should be to ascertain if it fits correctly and to measure the amount of rotation of the lens and to compensate for the rotation when determining the final prescription. There are numerous texts and descriptive papers on when and how an over-refraction should be conducted, but that should not be necessary with the method that I have described.

Summary

As the average thickness of toric lenses is influenced by the by prism ballast or periballast and therefore increased thickness in parts of the lens, the oxygen transmissibility may be compromised and this will almost always be negated by the use of silicone hydrogel materials.

As silicone hydrogels,as a category, represent at least 60% of prescribed soft lenses there is every reason to believe that the same statistic applies to toric soft lenses. Fitting and prescribing should no longer be considered as specialty lenses except for those prescriptions that require custom designs.

As toric silicone hydrogel lenses are more expensive than spherical lenses practitioners should guard against non-compliance of exceeding the manufacturers recommended replacement frequency as this habit has been demonstrated in two studies [19,20].

References

1.      Fonn D, Gauthier CA, Pritchard N.Patient preferences and comparative ocular responses to rigid and soft contactlenses. Optom Vis Sci 1995; 72:857-863

2.      Snyder C, Talley DK: Masking of astigmatism withselected spherical soft contact lenses. J Am Optom Assoc 1989; 60:728-31.

3.       Richdale K,Bersten D, Mack K et al. Visual Acuity with Spherical and Toric Soft Contact Lenses in Low- to Moderate-Astigmatic Eyes. OptomVis Sci 2007; 84: 969-75.

4.       Cho P, Cheung SW, Charm J. Visualoutcome of Soflens Daily Disposable and Soflens Daily Disposable forAstigmatism in subjects with low astigmatism. Clin Exp Optom. 2012; 95: 43–47.

5.       Morgan PB,Efron SE, Efron N, Hill EA: Inefficacy of aspheric soft contact lenses for thecorrection of low levels of astigmatism. Optom Vis Sci 2005; 82: 823-8.

6.      Holden BA. The principles and practiceof correcting astigmatism with soft contact lenses.Aust J Optom 1975;58: 279–99.

7.      Young G, Sully A, Hunt C. Prevalenceof astigmatism in relation to soft contact lens fitting. Eye Contact Lens2011;37: 20 -25

8.      Pearson R. Contact lens trends in the UnitedKingdom in 1991. J Brit Contact Lens Assoc 1992; 15:17 - 23.9.      Anstice J. Astigmatism–its componentsand their changes with age. Am J Optom Arch Am Acad Optom 1971; 48: 1001–1006.

10.  Fledelius HC, Stubgaard M. Changes inrefraction and corneal curvature during growth and adult life. Across-sectional study. Acta Ophthalmol Copenh 1986; 64: 487–491.

11.  Satterfield DS. Prevalence andvariation of astigmatism in a military population. J Am Optom Assoc 1989;60: 14–18


12.  Read SA, Collins MJ, Carney LG. Areview of astigmatism and its possible genesis. Clin Exp Optom 2007; 90:5–19.


13.  Morgan PB, Efron N. Prescribing softcontact lenses for astigmatism. Cont Lens Ant Eye 2009;32: 97–98.


14.  Morgan P. Trends in UK contact lensprescribing 2010. Optician 2010; 239: 34–35.


15.  Barr JT. Contact lenses 2001. ContLens Spectrum 2002; 17:22–28.


16.  Nichols JJ. Contact lenses 2009. ContLens Spectrum 2010; 25:20–27.


17.  Efron N, Morgan P, Helland M et al.Soft toric contact lens prescribing in different countries. Contact Lens & Anterior Eye. 2011; 34: 36–38


18.   Young G, McIlraith R, Hunt C. Clinical Evaluation of Factors Affecting SoftToric Lens Orientation Optom Vis Sci 2009;86: E1259- E1266


19.  Richter D, Dumbleton K, Guthrie S, Woods C, JonesL, Fonn D: Patient and practitioner compliance with silicone hydrogel and dailydisposable lens replacement in Canada. Can J Optom 2010;72: 10-19


20.  Dumbleton K, Woods C, Jones L, Fonn D: Comfort andvision with silicone hydrogel lenses: Effects of compliance. Optom VisSci 2010; 

FREE Webinar Today on Patient Retention: Leveraging the 2-Week Modality

Posted by CooperVision on Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Don’t miss out the third webinar that is part of the Building Your Practice series today. In this webinar, Dr. Steven Berger will discuss how the use of the 2-week modality can help you keep your contact lens patients comfortable, happy, and prevent them from dropping out!

We'll cover the major reasons — both economic and clinical — that cause patients to discontinue their lens wear, and effective methods to combat these issues.

Dr. Steven Berger, Owner/Operator of Eye to Eye Contact, is celebrating his 25th Anniversary in Delaware County. With more than 25 years of experience, Dr. Berger has also served as a professional advisor and speaker for both contact lens and spectacle manufacturers, allowing him to always keep a step ahead with the newest technology in optical products.

Make sure to click here to reserve your spot for this exciting webinar.

The Difference Between Dry Eye and Allergies

Posted by Harvard Sylvan, OD on Tuesday, August 28, 2012

The two most commonly experienced eye related problems (not including needing glasses or contact lenses) are dry eyes and ocular allergies. Although some symptoms are similar, there are distinct differences between the two eye conditions. In fact, dry eye and ocular allergy can occur simultaneously. If you are a contact lens wearer, both dry eye and allergies can make wearing contact lenses more difficult.

Dry Eye

Tears are not made of just water. There are numerous components to tears, but think of them simply as having three layers – mucin, water and lipids. A dry eye situation occurs when either too little water/mucin is produced, or if too little lipid is produced. The lipid layer is the outer layer of the tears and its primary role is to prevent the tears from evaporating or spilling over the lid margins. The lipid layer is produced by glands on the edge of the lids called meibomian glands. The majority of dry eye is caused by a decrease in this lipid layer. Certain medical conditions can also cause dry eye. The most common symptoms include burning, a sandy, gritty feeling, redness and sometimes reflex tearing.

Allergies

While eye allergies can also cause redness and tearing, the main symptom is itching. An ocular allergy is caused by sensitivity to a substance that is not usually harmful. When the allergen interacts with cells called mast cells, a substance called histamine is released which causes itching, redness, and swelling. Most allergies are due to environmental factors like pollen, cat dander, dust mites, etc. There are also more serious ocular allergies that require medical intervention.

Treatment

Treatment is different for dry eye and ocular allergies. Dry eye treatment includes treating the meibomian glands, the underlying inflammation, and using tear lubricants. The treatment for ocular allergy includes using antihistamine/mast cell stabilizers (to prevent the release of histamine from the mast cells), artificial lubricants, cool compresses and avoidance of the allergen (if possible).

For contact lens wearers, your doctor may choose a contact lens with a material that is more resistant to drying out like CooperVision’s Proclear lenses. For allergy sufferers, wearing a 1 day disposable lens will give the best chance for successful lens wear. CooperVision’s Proclear 1 Day and Proclear 1 Day Multifocal lenses provide the best option as they are resistant to drying out and get replaced each day.

Many people use over- the- counter products to self- treat dry eye and ocular allergy problems. It is estimated that the cost of doing that exceeds the cost of prescription products which are more effective. If you feel that you have dry eye or ocular allergies, see your eye doctor for a complete evaluation and recommendations for the best treatment options.

The Benefits of Multifocal Contact Lenses

Posted by Harvard Sylvan, OD on Thursday, August 16, 2012

Eye doctors are well aware of the growing number of presbyopes in the U.S. Fitting presbyopes provides a huge opportunity for contact lens practice growth. The number of presbyopic patients is expected to double by 2030 and will account for 20% of the population. It is estimated that over 30% of patients in the average practice are presbyopes. In addition, approximately 2 million current contact lens wearers are becoming presbyopic each year… and the majority of them want to continue to wear contacts. Soft multifocal contacts provide distinct benefits for both patients and practitioners.

Benefits for Patients

We all know that for presbyopic patients, soft multifocal contacts allow them to participate in numerous activities without the hassle of glasses and provide better peripheral vision. Many people also use computers. Multifocal contacts eliminate the need to tilt the head back like patients have to with glasses. Glasses can also become uncomfortable on the bridge of the nose and on and behind the ears as well. Multifocal contacts are also a great option for patients that want to look their best. There are also benefits for children with accommodative or convergence excess problems. Most children don’t want to wear bifocal glasses and multifocal contacts allow them to have the additional plus that is needed at near. With multifocal contact lenses, younger patients may benefit from more self confidence.

Why Multifocals?

Many doctors still utilize monovision to fit their presbyopic patients, but humans have a binocular visual system. There is an old adage that states, ‘two eyes are better than one’. Multifocal contacts provide improved intermediate vision that may be lacking with monovision and maintains binocular summation which enhances stereopsis and, usually, both distance and near acuity. Numerous studies have concluded that when given the opportunity to experience both multifocals and monovision, the majority of patients prefer multifocals 1,2,3 In a supplement to the July 2012 issue of Contact Lens Spectrum entitled, ‘Multifocals: The New Standard of Care’, Dr. John Schachet states, ‘We've established that multifocal contact lenses have replaced monovision as the standard of care’. I concur with that statement.

Benefits for Eye Doctors

There are also benefits to fitting multifocal contacts for doctors. The main benefit, besides the gratification of satisfying the needs of the patient, is the increase in patient referrals. Invariably, when I have successfully fit a patient with multifocals, that patient is enthusiastic and excited and always seems to have a friend, family member or co-worker that is referred for a multifocal fitting. That leads to an increase in practice revenue and profitability.

Fitting multifocal contacts benefits both patient and doctor and is the win-win solution that eye doctors are always seeking.

Fitting Children with Contact Lenses

Posted by Harvard Sylvan, OD on Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Many parents ask when it is appropriate for an eye doctor to fit children with contact lenses. As we have written before, there is no specific age limitation to children wearing contact lenses. There are even babies who have been fit with contacts. The main considerations for a parent to consider are the motivation and maturity of the child and his/her ability to insert and remove the lenses; especially when the child is not at home. A good indication of motivation is the child asking for contact lenses rather than the parent suggesting it. I have had patients as young as 8 years of age who have been successful contact lenses wearers and been very adept at inserting and removing the lenses.

There are many advantages to fitting children with contact lenses:

  • For sports and other outdoor activities: Contacts are less cumbersome than glasses, provide better peripheral vision, won’t fog up or get splattered by dirt or raindrops and eliminate the possibility of the glasses breaking and perhaps causing an eye injury.
  • For children with focusing and/or convergence problems:Often, bifocal glasses are prescribed. As most children and teenagers do not want to wear bifocal glasses, they may remove them after leaving their homes. Fitting children with contact lenses will increase the likelihood of the needed correction being worn.
  • Psychological benefit of fitting children with contact lenses:In many cases, especially if the prescription is high, fitting children with contact lenses will give them a better self image and more self confidence.

Daily disposable contacts are the ideal lenses for children. These lenses are worn during only one day and then discarded. No cleaning and disinfecting is required. A fresh, clean and comfortable lens is utilized each day the lenses are worn. Contact lens related problems are minimized when wearing one day disposable lenses. Also, if the child has allergies, one day disposable lenses are the best option for contact lens wear.

If you are considering having your child fit with contact lenses, ask your eye doctor about CooperVision’s Proclear 1 Day lenses. These lenses are made from a material that resists deposits, drying out and provides excellent all day comfort.

Making a Difference: Real Stories from Optometry Giving Sight

Posted by CooperVision on Monday, July 30, 2012

CooperVision is a proud sponsor of the international charity Optometry Giving Sight. We are excited to introduce a monthly series of posts from Optometry Giving Sight called “Making a Difference: Real Stories from Optometry Giving Sight.” This series will be about how patients have been given back a life of opportunity with the help of Optometry Giving Sight.

Here is Adrian’s story as shared to us from Optometry Giving Sight:

Adrian swaggers into Mozambique’s Lúrio University eye clinic and slumps in a chair. He gives off an air of bravado and appears to have a certain attitude. At 14, he is the oldest of five children who struggle to survive, living in a one room 5X4 mud-over-bamboo home in a shanty town in Mozambique. Adrian doesn’t have a dad and his mother tries to make ends meet with whatever work she can find.

Adrian’s favorite subjects at school are math, language and social studies, but he finds study difficult and gets bored quickly as he can’t see the chalkboard. He often misses classes as he has to pick up odd jobs to earn extra money for his family.

As Adrian was progressively refracted his vision became clearer and clearer until he was found to have a significant requirement of -7.50DS and -9.00DS. As the lenses were placed into the trial frame his macho act slipped. He became just a 14-year old boy in need of help– and who was seeing clearly for the very first time.

Adrian hopes his new glasses will help him improve in school and realize his ambition of becoming a teacher.

With his level of vision impairment Adrian’s new glasses will transform his life.

Optometry Giving Sight partnered with Lurio University, The International Centre for Eyecare Education, Brazilian Optometric Association and Irish Aid to implement the Campaign for Quality Vision in Mozambique.

Click here to learn more about Optometry Giving Sight and how CooperVision is working with its patients to help make a difference in the lives of patients like Adrian.

FAQS about Daily Disposable Contact Lenses

Posted by CooperVision on Wednesday, July 18, 2012

What is a daily disposable contact lens?

A daily disposable contact lens is a contact lens that you wear for one day. A patient puts them in the morning, and then throws them away at night. Each day, the patient starts with a fresh, clean, new pair of contact lenses. CooperVision offers a daily disposable contact lens option with its Proclear 1 Day contact lenses.

Are daily disposable contact lenses easy to care for?

Since daily disposable contact lenses are replaced every day, there is little contact lens maintenance. They are convenient because there are no time-consuming cleaning regimens to remember, and no solutions to buy.

Are daily disposable contact lenses comfortable?

Proclear 1 Day contact lenses are made with a unique lens material, with PC Hydration Technology™, that contains molecules found naturally in human cell membranes. These molecules attract and surround themselves with water, keeping your disposable contact lenses moist and comfortable, even after 12 hours of wear.

I have allergies and avoid wearing contact lenses. Are daily disposable contact lenses are a good option for me?

Proteins and allergens don't have time to build up on your lenses because you will be using a fresh new lens every day. This is especially helpful to those with seasonal ocular allergies.

How do I know what contact lenses are right for me?

Deciding which contact lenses are right for you is something that an eye doctor can help you with. Based on your vision correction needs, lifestyle, and preferences, an eye doctor will be able to guide you to the right contact lens for you. To get started, you can use CooperVision’s Find A Lens quiz. Take this quiz to find out how to choose contact lenses that could help you enjoy the best in vision, health, and comfort. Be sure to print your results and bring them to your next appointment to help start the conversation with your eye doctor.

Growing Your Multifocal Practice

Posted by CooperVision on Thursday, May 31, 2012

According to Contact Lens Spectrum, patients who suffer from presbyopia are projected to be the single largest group of potential contact lens wearers by 2018. With so many presbyopic patients flooding the market, fitting multifocal contact lenses is a smart way for eye care practitioners to grow their practices.

Presbyopic patients have not had too many options in the past when it came to contact lenses. As a result, contact lens usage drops among patients after the age of 45 which is when patients need vision correction because of presbyopia. The good news is that now, there are a lot of new multifocal contact lens options available. Is your practice ready to help fit these patients with new multifocal contact lenses?

Here are some tips to help you grow a successful multifocal practice:

  • Focus on Your Patients: It helps when eye care practitioners ask patients what they need vision correction for. Does the patient need it for precision work? Does the patient need uncompromised distance vision? Are there lifestyle needs that the patient has where eyeglasses are not a great option? It is easier for eye care practitioners to decide which patients may be the best candidates for multifocal contact lenses once those questions are answered.
  • Learn About Fitting For Presbyopes: Fitting prospective multifocal contact lens patients the first time can be challenging. Take advantage of contact lens manufacturers’ fitting tools in order to ensure that your patients are fit right the first time. CooperVision offers a fitting tool called the MultiTrak Calculator to help you calculate multifocal lens parameters directly from a spectacle prescription or an over-refraction, using lens-on-eye information. MultiTrack is available for your desktop computer and is a Web-based application, which gives you the added benefit of being able to order lenses directly from the application.
  • Follow Up: Patients with presbyopia will need a follow up just to ensure that the vision correction is ideal for them. Following up with patients after a few days will allow eye care practitioners to adjust the prescription in necessary or even recommend a different modality based on the patient’s lifestyle needs. For example, patients who would like to wake up and see right away may benefit from extended wear contact lenses such as CooperVision’s Biofinity Multifocal contact lenses. If patients don’t want to deal with the hassle of contact lens maintenance, there is even a daily disposable multifocal contact lens option. CooperVision just introduced Proclear 1 day multifocal contact lenses. Whatever the need your presbyopic patient has, there are options.

Make sure to take advantage of the latest multifocal contact lens offerings and watch your multifocal practice thrive!

Don’t Miss It! Free Webinar on Fitting Patients with Multifocal Daily Disposables

Posted by CooperVision on Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Are you interested in building your practice? Make sure to catch today’s second part of a webinar series called Your Practice In Focus.

This second webinar is Fitting Patients With Multifocal Daily Disposables. Daily disposable lenses have many advantages over other lens modalities. It is a segment of contact lenses that is growing rapidly. Another significant segment is the presbyopic population. According to a recent study, 25 percent more people globally are expected to become presbyopic by the year 2020. This is incredibly significant given that the pool of presbyopes is already estimated at more than one billion worldwide.

However, the choices for lenses that are both multifocal and daily disposable are very limited. Eye care practitioners have had to have patients choose between vision performance and convenience, but that is no longer the case. With CooperVision’s Proclear® 1 day multifocal contact lenses, eye care practitioners will have a high performance multifocal contact lens that is also a convenient daily disposable.

This webinar, hosted by CooperVision’s Senior Manager of Clinical Research, Paul Chamberlain, will provide an overview of Proclear 1 day multifocal contact lenses and the benefits of building your multifocal practice. Don’t miss out! Make sure to register for this exciting webinar here.

CooperVision Introduces Proclear® 1 day multifocal lenses

Posted by CooperVision on Tuesday, May 29, 2012

More than one billion people worldwide have a vision condition called presbyopia, which is a natural decrease in the ability of the lens in the eye to change its shape to focus on close objects. We’ve all seen others struggle with trying to read menus and newspapers. Maybe it has even happened to you.

CooperVision announced the launch of Proclear® 1 day multifocal daily disposable contact lenses for patients like you who are looking for a convenient, comfortable, and healthier lens to wear full time, occasionally, or to complement progressive eyeglasses or reading glasses.

“When it comes to your vision or the way you live your life, we don’t think anyone should have to compromise,” said Dennis Murphy, Executive Vice President, Global Sales and Marketing, CooperVision. “With Proclear® 1 day multifocal lenses, vision is clear near, far, and in-between, without the need for spectacles.”

Not only is it a high performance contact lens, it is comfortable too. Proclear® is the only lens material cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the claim that it: “May provide improved comfort for those who experience dryness or mild discomfort during lens wear.” This is especially important for patients who often find that age-related dryness is an issue and deterrent for wearing contact lenses. Proclear® also offers natural biocompatibility, meaning that the lenses are made to imitate the cells of the human eye.

It is convenient too. With daily disposable lenses, the cost and hassle of contact lens maintenance is eliminated. And because the lenses are replaced each day, they are one of the healthiest contact lens options available. Proclear® 1 day multifocal lenses provide patients with the freedom to maintain an active and social lifestyle, allowing the wearer to decide whether to wear the lenses all day, part of the day, or reserve them for special situations. Plus, as your prescription changes, your eye care practitioner can easily adjust it, which means minimal disturbance to your vision, shorter appointments, and fewer follow-ups.

The lens will be launched initially in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and a number of European countries. Click here to learn more on the Proclear® 1 day multifocal.

About On Eye

On Eye is the contact lens blog from CooperVision. On this site, you will find insights about fitting, technology, and the business of contact lenses. The On Eye blog is designed to meet the needs of both Eye Care Practitioners and consumers. ECP and medical professional-specific portions of the blog will be password protected in order to protect and reserve the privacy of the profession. To read more about our terms of use, please see the Legal tab.

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